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Home: All Other Football Interests: All other football:
FIFA International Eligibility Guidelines Pt.2

 



MistaFozzII
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Mar 18, 2012, 4:04 PM

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Location: Shildon, Co Durham
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Post #1 of 7 (1700 views)
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FIFA International Eligibility Guidelines Pt.2 Can't Post or Reply Privately

Pt. 2 about International Football...

Why are Northern Irish players allowed to declare for the Republic, I know it has been a rule for a bit, but one that recently stood out is Sunderland's James McClean, who plays for the Republic depsite being born in Derry.

Using that argument alone could an English Born Player with no connection to Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland, for example, if I was a footballer would I have an argument to say I feel I identify with the other country more than England...

So how come N.I born players can declare themselves for one or the other, does it mean a Republic born player can play for the North if they wanted???

Is this deal anything to do with the Good Friday Agreement???



Mista Fozz

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buncranaboy
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Mar 18, 2012, 4:05 PM

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Post #2 of 7 (1699 views)
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Re: [MistaFozzII] FIFA International Eligibility Guidelines Pt.2 [In reply to] Can't Post or Reply Privately


In Reply To
Pt. 2 about International Football...

Why are Northern Irish players allowed to declare for the Republic, I know it has been a rule for a bit, but one that recently stood out is Sunderland's James McClean, who plays for the Republic depsite being born in Derry.

Using that argument alone could an English Born Player with no connection to Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland, for example, if I was a footballer would I have an argument to say I feel I identify with the other country more than England...

So how come N.I born players can declare themselves for one or the other, does it mean a Republic born player can play for the North if they wanted???

Is this deal anything to do with the Good Friday Agreement???



Because there's no such country as Northern Ireland ?


MistaFozzII
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Mar 18, 2012, 6:23 PM

Posts: 1406
Location: Shildon, Co Durham
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Re: [buncranaboy] FIFA International Eligibility Guidelines Pt.2 [In reply to] Can't Post or Reply Privately

Fair enough, but it still remains that players born in the North can play for the team based in the South, a country where they are not from...

Using the 'There is no such country as Northern Ireland' argument, then is there such a country as Scotland and Wales, and thinking a little further away The Faroe Islands and Liechtenstein?



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zebedee
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Mar 18, 2012, 8:05 PM

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Re: [MistaFozzII] FIFA International Eligibility Guidelines Pt.2 [In reply to] Can't Post or Reply Privately

I believe it is to do with the Good Friday Agreement - I think that part of it states that anyone born anywhere in the island of Ireland can choose to claim Irish or UK nationality.


VP
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Mar 18, 2012, 9:43 PM

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Post #5 of 7 (1656 views)
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Re: [MistaFozzII] FIFA International Eligibility Guidelines Pt.2 [In reply to] Can't Post or Reply Privately


In Reply To
Pt. 2 about International Football...

Why are Northern Irish players allowed to declare for the Republic, I know it has been a rule for a bit, but one that recently stood out is Sunderland's James McClean, who plays for the Republic depsite being born in Derry.

Using that argument alone could an English Born Player with no connection to Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland, for example, if I was a footballer would I have an argument to say I feel I identify with the other country more than England...

So how come N.I born players can declare themselves for one or the other, does it mean a Republic born player can play for the North if they wanted???

Is this deal anything to do with the Good Friday Agreement???


It's nothing to do with the Good Friday agreement as the rules were in place before that came about.
Eligibility is based on nationality rather than birthplace. You can change countries (as long as you haven't played a full international) just as you can change your nationality. These days you can represent a country just by living or working there for a period of time.
As an example, our manager, Darren Barnard, was born in Germany, played at under 18 level for England and full internationals for Wales.

Regarding Ireland specifically:-

Contrary to popular misconception, the Good Friday Agreement of 1998 has nothing to do with the application of FIFA’s statutes on Irish nationality. The Good Friday Agreement was a constitutional document agreed between the British and Irish governments after backing from the majority of the electorate in Northern Ireland that, amongst numerous other things, acknowledged and bilaterally endorsed, as an undisputed right of law, the will of members of Northern Ireland’s nationalist community to identify as Irish. It is frustrating to see it continually bandied about in discussions surrounding player eligibility, however, especially when the eligibility of Northern Ireland-born Irish nationals to play for the Republic of Ireland is being attributed to its terms. It is mentioned here in order to discount this misguided belief.

Players born in Northern Ireland have been lining out for FAI teams under FIFA rules identical in effect to those in place today before the Good Friday Agreement. Ger Crossley, Gerard Doherty, Mark McKeever and Tony Shields, for example, were all born in Northern Ireland and, qualifying via their birthright to Irish nationality, played for FAI teams between 1995 and 1997. It would have been difficult for the FAI to turn them away given they were Irish nationals, after all. Countless others have played for Irish teams between the signing of the Good Friday Agreement and the saga involving Darron Gibson that seemed to implant the issue of player eligibility in the minds of Northern Ireland football supporters.

By virtue of articles 2 and 3 of Bunreacht na hÉireann and sections 6 and 7 of the Irish Nationality and Citizenship Act 1956, Irish nationality has been available from birth to those born in Northern Ireland who have wished to have it recognised long before 1998


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buncranaboy
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Mar 18, 2012, 9:50 PM

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Re: [VP] FIFA International Eligibility Guidelines Pt.2 [In reply to] Can't Post or Reply Privately

Given the treatment meted out to some Catholics who have been selected for Northern Ireland, it's hardly surprising really.

There may be some non-Catholics playing for the Republic - I don't know and couldn't care less; shame some of the numpties up North can't see it the same way. Having said that, they can have Darron Gibson back if they want Tongue


leohoenig
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Mar 19, 2012, 8:38 AM

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Post #7 of 7 (1613 views)
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Re: [buncranaboy] FIFA International Eligibility Guidelines Pt.2 [In reply to] Can't Post or Reply Privately


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Given the treatment meted out to some Catholics who have been selected for Northern Ireland, it's hardly surprising really.

There may be some non-Catholics playing for the Republic - I don't know and couldn't care less; shame some of the numpties up North can't see it the same way. Having said that, they can have Darron Gibson back if they want Tongue


Surely this is the one thing they cannot have, under eligibility laws. (You cannot change after playing for one country).



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