Non League Matters - The Continuation of Tonys english Football Site 



  Main Index MAIN
INDEX
Search Posts SEARCH
POSTS
Who's Online WHO'S
ONLINE
Log in LOG
IN

Home: All Other Football Interests: All other football:
FIFA International Eligibility Guidelines Pt.1

 



MistaFozzII
First Team Regular


Mar 18, 2012, 3:44 PM

Posts: 1406
Location: Shildon, Co Durham
Team(s): Darlingto

Post #1 of 7 (2643 views)
Shortcut
FIFA International Eligibility Guidelines Pt.1 Can't Post or Reply Privately

This is part 1 of a 2 part subject...

When foreigners move to the UK without having played for there home country, if they want to play International football and get UK residency, who can they play for, does it mean they can play for the country whose league they play in e.g. A few years ago Manuel Almunia was supposedly interested in playing for England, even though he is Spanish born, would England have been the only option open to him and do foreign players in the same boat have only one option in pursuing there international career, e.g if you play in the English Premier League, with Manuel Almunia being at Arsenal was England his only choice, I only ask because I am sure I read somewhere that foreign born players can choose any home nation they want, so could, for example, a foreign player at Celtic or Rangers who has never played in the Premier League declare for any of the 4 Nations...Also what is the rules for British Dependencies, e.g Gibraltarians, Falkland Islanders and Channel Islanders, I seem to remember Matt Le Tissier, being from Guernsey being able to choose who he played International Football with.

So what exactly is the rule regarding International Eligibility



Mista Fozz

Husband, Dad, Mascot Extraordinaire and all round Idiot

nisi tu Deus, qui possit iudicare
My Facebook Profile
My Twitter Feed


acmold
Man City Transfer Target!

Mar 19, 2012, 11:42 AM

Posts: 14497
Location:
Team(s):

Post #2 of 7 (2600 views)
Shortcut
Re: [MistaFozzII] FIFA International Eligibility Guidelines Pt.1 [In reply to] Can't Post or

Thinking about those two well known Welshmen Pat Van Den Hauwe and Eric Young


leohoenig
Administrator

Mar 19, 2012, 12:06 PM

Posts: 13536
Location: Outer Cheltenhamshire
Team(s): Cheltenham Town

Post #3 of 7 (2594 views)
Shortcut
Re: [acmold] FIFA International Eligibility Guidelines Pt.1 [In reply to] Can't Post or Reply Privately

van den Hauwe qualified as Welsh trhough his mother.
Young, however is a questionable Welshman. Born in Singapore, British Citizen, living in England. No known welsh ancestary.



Fat AND Pompous.
The proof that you can have too much of a good thing
Now blogging at http://www.leohoenig.com



sandhurstbee
Man City Transfer Target!


Mar 23, 2012, 1:12 PM

Posts: 6446
Location: Little Sandhurst, Berkshire
Team(s): Brentford, Sandhurst Town and Most local Non League sides.

Post #4 of 7 (2480 views)
Shortcut
Re: [leohoenig] FIFA International Eligibility Guidelines Pt.1 [In reply to] Can't Post or Reply Privately


In Reply To
van den Hauwe qualified as Welsh trhough his mother.
Young, however is a questionable Welshman. Born in Singapore, British Citizen, living in England. No known welsh ancestary.


There was that incident with a sheep Tongue - Oh no one was suspossed to know about that! Wink



***********************************
Last New Ground 2016/17 (15) 29/4/2017 HIGHMOOR/IBIS RESERVES 1 Mortimer 1 - Thames Valley premier league, Premier Division



AndyE
First Team Star

Mar 24, 2012, 11:39 PM

Posts: 2386
Location: Rochester
Team(s): Chatham Town

Post #5 of 7 (2429 views)
Shortcut
Re: [sandhurstbee] FIFA International Eligibility Guidelines Pt.1 [In reply to] Can't Post or Reply Privately

Coming back to the question ...

If a foreign-born player has an ancestral qualification for any of the Home Nations, then he can only play for that nation(s). So for instance, Owen Hargreaves - born in Canada of an English father and Welsh mother - was able to choose between Canada, England, and Wales. (And in fact, he did play for Wales at schoolboy before switching allegiance.) Further, he was only a few months short of also becoming eligible for Germany by residence at the point at which he committed to England.

If a foreign-born player has no ancestral qualification, then he can play for any of the Home Nations. Matt le Tissier's family is from Guernsey as far back as anyone knows, and so he had no ancestral qualification - and it's occasionally been claimed that Scotland enquired about his availability before he committed to England.

When Lawrie McMenemy was manager of England U-21, he was quite keen to poach Ryan Giggs from Wales, and so he had his people do some family tree research. But they found out that - despite having lived in England from the age of six - the only countries for which he was eligible were Wales and Sierra Leone.


Part-Timer
Chelsea Transfer Target

Mar 25, 2012, 12:47 PM

Posts: 4522
Location: Huntingdonshire
Team(s): Brentford, Bradford City, Peterborough United, Yaxley

Post #6 of 7 (2402 views)
Shortcut
Re: [AndyE] FIFA International Eligibility Guidelines Pt.1 [In reply to] Can't Post or Reply Privately


In Reply To
Coming back to the question ...

If a foreign-born player has an ancestral qualification for any of the Home Nations, then he can only play for that nation(s). So for instance, Owen Hargreaves - born in Canada of an English father and Welsh mother - was able to choose between Canada, England, and Wales. (And in fact, he did play for Wales at schoolboy before switching allegiance.) Further, he was only a few months short of also becoming eligible for Germany by residence at the point at which he committed to England.

If a foreign-born player has no ancestral qualification, then he can play for any of the Home Nations. Matt le Tissier's family is from Guernsey as far back as anyone knows, and so he had no ancestral qualification - and it's occasionally been claimed that Scotland enquired about his availability before he committed to England.

When Lawrie McMenemy was manager of England U-21, he was quite keen to poach Ryan Giggs from Wales, and so he had his people do some family tree research. But they found out that - despite having lived in England from the age of six - the only countries for which he was eligible were Wales and Sierra Leone.


Interesting that you can qualify for a completely foreign country by residence but not a home nation.

Here's another anomoly, of sorts. My son qualifies to play for England by birth and passport and also for Poland through his maternal ancestry (although not by footballing ability) despite having never been there or speaking a single word of Polish. I, on the other hand, qualify only for England despite having spent some time in Poland and speaking some of the language. Go figure, as they say on the other side of the pond (where I have two nephews who are eligible to play for both England and the USA).


AndyE
First Team Star

Mar 25, 2012, 3:37 PM

Posts: 2386
Location: Rochester
Team(s): Chatham Town

Post #7 of 7 (2389 views)
Shortcut
Re: [Part-Timer] FIFA International Eligibility Guidelines Pt.1 [In reply to] Can't Post or Reply Privately

It is a bit odd - it's all to do with the four Home Nations being legally one country. I suppose the point is that if anyone could qualify for any Home Nation by residence, all the best players from Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland would end up playing for England - and that is not considered desirable.

Ordinarily, one becomes eligible for a country after five years residence - so you could have played for Poland if you had actually settled there permanently. There are a few exceptions though. The special treatment of the UK is one, and so is the fact that people from Northern Ireland can play for the Republic (which is a consequence of Irish nationality law).

Another special case concerns ethnic Greeks from outside Greece. Any such person can apply to join the Greek Armed Forces, and upon enlisting they automatically become a Greek citizen (unless they are already a Cypriot citizen) and are eligible to play for Greece.

A friend of mine once sat opposite Paul Stalteri on a flight to Toronto. Mr Stalteri told the guy sat next to him that he never realistically expected to be asked to play for his father's native Italy, which would have been his first choice. But he said that Guyana and Malta both approached him when he was on the point of committing to Canada, the land of his birth.

 
 


free hit counters

Search for (options) HOSTED BY SUMMIT SOCCER v.1.2.3